Nov
27
2014
0

On this day

1096 a

Pope Urban II issues his call for the first crusade 

#OnThisDay in 1096, the Holy Father delivered a speech at the Council of Clermont that would trigger the crusades. The Council had brought together 300 leading figures in the Catholic Church in France, but Pope Urban targeted his words at the chivalric ideals of the knights and nobles of France.

Pope Urban II preaching at the Council of Clermont. Sébastien Mamerot, Les passages d'outremer  Jean Colombe [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The Pope called on all Christians in Europe to go to war against Muslims in order to help the besieged Eastern Orthodox churches and to reclaim the Holy Land.

According to legend, the Holy Father finished his speech with the rallying cry of ‘Deus vult!’ or ‘God wills it!’.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
25
2014
0

On this day

1867

Alfred Nobel patents dynamite

#OnThisDay in 1867, Swedish chemist, inventor and entrepreneur Alfred Nobel patented his discovery of dynamite. Dynamite was easier and safer to handle than its more unstable predecessor nitroglycerin.

Portrait of Alfred Nobel (1833–1896) by Gösta Florman (1831–1900) [Public Domain, via Wikicommons]

It would play a crucial role in some of the late nineteenth centuries engineering and mining triumphs, literally blasting paths for progress.

Nobel considered naming his invention Nobel’s Safety Powder, but instead chose a name inspired by the Greek word dunamis, meaning force, power, capability and strength and all conveying the explosive power of the discovery.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
24
2014
0

On this day

1859

Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of  Species

#OnThisDay in 1859, Charles Darwin’s seminal work on evolutionary biology On the Origin of Species is published.

Title page of the 1859 Murray edition of On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
23
2014
0

On this day

1936

Life magazine is launched in its new format by Henry Luce, revolutionising photojournalism

#OnThisDay in 1936, the first edition of Henry Luce’s Life magazine was published. Fulfilling the adage that a picture is worth a thousand words, Life’s focus on images brought it huge success and influence.

Cover of the 19 June 1944 issue of Life (magazine) with Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower By LIFE magazine, Time Inc., Official U. S. Army Photo in cover (Google images) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Life reached a peak circulation of a staggering 8.5 million, before this levelled off and fell as it came under increasing competition from other magazines, television and, ultimately, the internet.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
22
2014
0

On this day

1963

JFK is assassinated in Dallas

#OnThisDay in 1963, President John F. Kennedy is assassinated in Dallas. His death resulted in the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson and decades of conspiracy theories and both amateur and professional sleuthing.

Picture of President Kennedy in the limousine in Dallas, Texas, on Main Street, minutes before the assassination

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
22
2014
0

How shall we remember them?

In 1919, London hosted a Victory Parade that marked a unique moment of national rejoicing, mourning and catharsis. The Parade, also known as the London Peace Parade, saw returning troops march through packed streets in the capital. The city’s iconic monuments were momentarily joined by a series of temporary structures erected to mark the march.

One of these, a plain but elegant wood and plaster cenotaph erected on Whitehall, would strike such a chord with the people that a permanent version would be built in its place. The stone-carved Cenotaph was unveiled the following year, and remains the focal point of national remembrance.

On 19 July 1919, London played host to 15,000 troops from across the British Empire. Their procession was  led by Field Marshal Douglas Haig and other senior military leaders. The capital was festooned with flags and bunting, the drab wartime caterpillar bursting into the vivid and victorious colour of an imperial butterfly.

The Cenotaph on Whitehall in London is designated as the United Kingdom’s primary war memorial. It commemorates the end of World War One.

The Union flag was proudly displayed alongside flags of the home nations, the dominions, the services and the banners of her allies. Whilst the Stars and Stripes and French Tricolour were popular, the defiant black, yellow and red of Belgium was a particularly poignant reminder of the start of the conflict.

Continue Reading…

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: British History,History |
Nov
22
2014
0

The United States of Greater Austria

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: Videos |
Nov
21
2014
-

On this day

1981

Over 80 million Americans tune in to Dallas to find out Who Shot JR

#OnThisDay in 1980, millions of people around the world were gripped to their televisions to find out who shot J.R. Ewing and get some resolution on one of TV’s most gripping and memorable season finale cliffhangers.

A promotional photograph of Larry Hagman as J. R. Ewing from the TNT television series Dallas. This image shows the character as depicted in 2012.

Although Dallas was first broadcast in 1978, its 12-season run would become one of the most defining popular cultural references of the 1980s. CBS’s Dallas would be joined by ABC’s Dynasty in 1981.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
20
2014
-

On this day

scriptina.regular

The Napoleonic Wars are formally concluded with the signing of the Treaty of Paris

Emperor Napoleon had abdicated for a second time in June 1815 following his astonishing return to power and almost as astonishing defeat at Waterloo. King Louis XVIII came back to occupy the throne for a second time on 8 July 1815.

Napoleon on the deck of HMS Bellerophon Charles Lock Eastlake [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AEastlake_-_Napoleon_on_the_Bellerophon.jpg

The Treaty of Paris was actually made up of four treaties, concluded between France and each of the four major powers of the Seventh Coalition: Austria, Great Britain, Prussia and Russia.

All four treaties were signed on this day in 1815.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |
Nov
18
2014
-

On this day

1447

England’s first dated book is printed in London

#OnThisDay in 1477, William Caxton prints the ‘Dictes & Sayengis of the Phylosophers’. Although this is not thought to be the first book to be printed in England, it is the first one printed with a date.

Caxton Showing the First Specimen of His Printing to King Edward IV at the Almonry, Westminster: With Edward are his wife, Elizabeth Woodville, and their children, Elizabeth, Edward, and Richard.

As well as the date, it also had the first example of a printer’s colophon – an identifying mark of the printer which provides the name of the printer and the place of publication.

Share me ... Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page
Written by IDC in: In This Week |

Design: TheBuckmaker.com WordPress Themes